New Mexico Fly Fishing https://nmffg.com Fly Fishing Guides, Fishing Reports and News Tue, 13 Aug 2019 18:33:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Pecos River Fly Fishing Public Access https://nmffg.com/pecos-river-new-mexico-fly-fishing/pecos-river-fly-fishing-public-access/ https://nmffg.com/pecos-river-new-mexico-fly-fishing/pecos-river-fly-fishing-public-access/#respond Tue, 13 Aug 2019 17:33:25 +0000 https://nmffg.com/?p=1488 The Pecos River is perhaps the most central location for anglers seeking the greatest array of fishing opportunities. The very best rainbow and brown trout fishing on the Pecos is found between Terrero and Cowles. The section just above Terrero is best fished by beginning at the Terrero General Store (parking across the river along […]

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The Pecos River is perhaps the most central location for anglers seeking the greatest array of fishing opportunities.

The very best rainbow and brown trout fishing on the Pecos is found between Terrero and Cowles. The section just above Terrero is best fished by beginning at the Terrero General Store (parking across the river along the road at Holy Ghost Campground) and fishing upstream. The upper canyon, also known as the Pecos Box, is accessed by hiking in from the parking area along the river just above Mora Creek Campground.

Cowles is the ideal jump-off location for day or expedition trips into the Pecos. Beattys Flat, Pecos Baldy Lake, Stewart and Johnson Lakes, are all a day’s backpack from Cowles. Horsethief Meadow, up Trail 288, and much of Panchuela Creek, keep you close to great stream fishing on Cave and Horsethief Creeks.

Pecos River Fly Fishing Public Access

Fishing in the Pecos Wilderness is about small streams and alpine lakes. The growing season is short, so fish eat whenever they get the opportunity and whatever floats by that will fit in their mouths unless, of course, they see an angler looming above the stream.

In the backcountry, anglers should carry just one box of flies and most of them should float. Don’t worry about nymphs unless you fish the lakes, in which case a couple of small nymphs and Woolly Buggers will see you through. What’s most important is for your flies to fit in one box.

After spring run-off passes, say, during the latter part of June through early August (the former more likely today), March Browns are the hatch of the day. New Mexicans call these flies Red Quills. These mayflies come off in huge numbers and are the No. 1 mayfly on the Pecos. The nymph resembles a size 12 to 14 cream to natural Hare’s Ear. The adult fly is more grayish than red, a close approximation tied by substituting an Adams’ muskrat body with Hare’s Ear dubbing.

Rainbow trout are quite abundant in the Pecos, but wild brown trout are perhaps the biggest draw.

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Cimarron River Fly Fishing Public Access https://nmffg.com/cimarron-river-fly-fishing/cimarron-river-fly-fishing-public-access/ https://nmffg.com/cimarron-river-fly-fishing/cimarron-river-fly-fishing-public-access/#respond Mon, 05 Aug 2019 16:48:58 +0000 https://nmffg.com/?p=1482 The first dozen miles of the Cimarron River (from Eagle Nest Lake to Ute Park, New Mexico) are known for fine trout fishing. Stocked trout include rainbow and brown. The river is maintained by the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish at a trout density of approximately 3,000 fish per mile, although water flow […]

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The first dozen miles of the Cimarron River (from Eagle Nest Lake to Ute Park, New Mexico) are known for fine trout fishing. Stocked trout include rainbow and brown. The river is maintained by the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish at a trout density of approximately 3,000 fish per mile, although water flow can vary between 2 and 50 cubic feet per second.

There is 8-10 miles of public access in the Cimarron Canyon State Park.

The Cimarron River is technically a small tailwater that fishes and looks more like a mountain freestone stream. The water features include riffles, pockets, bend pools, undercut banks, beaver ponds, drop-offs, runs and everything in between. These water characteristics, along with a dense aquatic insect population, make the Cimarron one of the best wild brown trout fisheries in the Southwest. New Mexico Game and Fish does stock rainbows throughout the Cimarron.

Cimarron River Fly Fishing Public Access

The Cimarron Canyon State Park has three maintained campgrounds with tent and RV sites. The small communities of Eagle Nest and Cimarron are the closest towns with basic amenities of restaurants, places to stay, gas stations, groceries and fishing licenses. The larger towns of Taos, Red River and Angel Fire offer more amenities but with a little longer drive.

The best time to fish the Cimarron is from May through mid October. Key hatches include Golden Stoneflies, PMDs, Tricos, Caddis, BWOs, Midges and Terrestrials.

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Rio Pueblo Trout Fly Fishing https://nmffg.com/video/rio-pueblo-trout-fly-fishing/ https://nmffg.com/video/rio-pueblo-trout-fly-fishing/#respond Sat, 27 Jul 2019 19:56:31 +0000 https://nmffg.com/?p=1477 One of the most popular trout fishing streams in the New Mexico. Paralleled by highway 518 along its entire length. Headwaters above Tres Ritos (Angostura and Alamitos Creek). Many campgrounds. Heavy thunderstorms overnight clouded the water for this video. New Mexico Hwy 518 runs from Taos, New Mexico South to Las Vegas, New Mexico. Numerous […]

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One of the most popular trout fishing streams in the New Mexico.

Paralleled by highway 518 along its entire length. Headwaters above Tres Ritos (Angostura and Alamitos Creek).

Many campgrounds.

Heavy thunderstorms overnight clouded the water for this video.

New Mexico Hwy 518 runs from Taos, New Mexico South to Las Vegas, New Mexico.

Numerous pull-out fly fishing public access points and improved campsites are located along Hwy 518 above Sipapu Ski Area.

The Rio Pueblo contains some of the best small pocket water fishing in the area.

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Pecos River Cowles Ponds Trout Fishing Public Access https://nmffg.com/pecos-river-new-mexico-fly-fishing/pecos-river-cowles-ponds-trout-fishing-public-access/ https://nmffg.com/pecos-river-new-mexico-fly-fishing/pecos-river-cowles-ponds-trout-fishing-public-access/#respond Wed, 29 May 2019 20:58:11 +0000 https://nmffg.com/?p=1407 Cowles Ponds are right next to the Pecos River and are surrounded by coniferous forests and grassy meadows. There are 2 ponds, a larger one, which was dredged and deepened in 2011, and is available to all anglers with a current NM fishing license, and a smaller pond open only to those 12 years of […]

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Cowles Ponds are right next to the Pecos River and are surrounded by coniferous forests and grassy meadows.

There are 2 ponds, a larger one, which was dredged and deepened in 2011, and is available to all anglers with a current NM fishing license, and a smaller pond open only to those 12 years of age and under and persons with disabilities. Both ponds are stocked periodically by the NMDGF with Brown and Rainbow Trout.

The Pecos River originates in 20 miles northeast of Santa Fe, New Mexico and flows into Texas, emptying into the Rio Grande at Lake Amistad. Its headwaters are on the eastern slope of the Sangre de Cristo mountain range in Mora County north of Pecos, NM, at an elevation of over 12,000 feet feet.

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Pecos River Terrero Bridge Trout Fly Fishing Public Access https://nmffg.com/pecos-river-new-mexico-fly-fishing/pecos-river-terrero-bridge-trout-fly-fishing-public-access/ https://nmffg.com/pecos-river-new-mexico-fly-fishing/pecos-river-terrero-bridge-trout-fly-fishing-public-access/#respond Sun, 26 May 2019 19:38:58 +0000 https://nmffg.com/?p=1402 Pecos River Fly Fishing Public Access May 2019 Tererro is an unincorporated community located in San Miguel County, New Mexico. The community is located on New Mexico State Road 63 11.6 miles north of Pecos, NM. Tererro has a post office and General Store. Pecos River Terrero Bridge Trout Fly Fishing Public Access A convenience […]

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Pecos River Fly Fishing Public Access May 2019

Tererro is an unincorporated community located in San Miguel County, New Mexico. The community is located on New Mexico State Road 63 11.6 miles north of Pecos, NM. Tererro has a post office and General Store.

Pecos River Fly Fishing Terrero Public Access
Pecos River Terrero Bridge Trout Fly Fishing Public Access

A convenience store, 14 miles up the Pecos Canyon from the town of Pecos New Mexico, in the Santa Fe National Forest. They sell groceries, camping, & fishing supplies, and have incredible hummingbird watching!

The Pecos River originates in 20 miles northeast of Santa Fe, New Mexico and flows into Texas, emptying into the Rio Grande at Lake Amistad. Its headwaters are on the eastern slope of the Sangre de Cristo mountain range in Mora County north of Pecos, NM, at an elevation of over 12,000 feet feet.

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Pecos River Fly Fishing Upper Dalton Public Fishing Access https://nmffg.com/pecos-river-new-mexico-fly-fishing/pecos-river-fly-fishing-upper-dalton-public-fishing-access/ https://nmffg.com/pecos-river-new-mexico-fly-fishing/pecos-river-fly-fishing-upper-dalton-public-fishing-access/#respond Sat, 25 May 2019 22:55:10 +0000 https://nmffg.com/?p=1392 Pecos River Fly Fishing Pecos River trout fly fishing public access. Known locally as the Rio Pecos. Six miles north of Pecos, New Mexico on NM highway 63. Fishing, picnicking, hiking, camping and backpacking. The Pecos River originates in 20 miles northeast of Santa Fe, New Mexico and flows into Texas, emptying into the Rio […]

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Pecos River Fly Fishing

Pecos River trout fly fishing public access. Known locally as the Rio Pecos.

Six miles north of Pecos, New Mexico on NM highway 63. Fishing, picnicking, hiking, camping and backpacking.

The Pecos River originates in 20 miles northeast of Santa Fe, New Mexico and flows into Texas, emptying into the Rio Grande at Lake Amistad. Its headwaters are on the eastern slope of the Sangre de Cristo mountain range in Mora County north of Pecos, NM, at an elevation of over 12,000 feet feet.

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Fly Fusion Cast Like a Pro Series: #7 Pick Up and Lay Down https://nmffg.com/video/fly-fusion-cast-like-a-pro-series-7-pick-up-and-lay-down/ https://nmffg.com/video/fly-fusion-cast-like-a-pro-series-7-pick-up-and-lay-down/#respond Fri, 10 May 2019 16:22:32 +0000 https://nmffg.com/?p=1387 Fly Casting Like a Pro Fly Fusion Field Editor Jeff Wagner and fly-fishing icon Bruce Richards cover various topics in this informative fly casting series that is packed full of cast-changing tips.

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Fly Casting Like a Pro

Fly Fusion Field Editor Jeff Wagner and fly-fishing icon Bruce Richards cover various topics in this informative fly casting series that is packed full of cast-changing tips.

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Game and Fish Investigates Fish Die Off in Pecos River https://nmffg.com/pecos-river-new-mexico-fly-fishing/game-and-fish-investigates-fish-die-off-in-pecos-river/ https://nmffg.com/pecos-river-new-mexico-fly-fishing/game-and-fish-investigates-fish-die-off-in-pecos-river/#respond Mon, 25 Mar 2019 20:29:35 +0000 https://nmffg.com/?p=1381 SANTA FE – The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish is investigating a fish die off in the upper Pecos River from the village of Pecos to Cowles. The die off is affecting brown and rainbow trout and is being attributed to stress induced by low water conditions and poor water quality throughout late […]

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New Mexico Game and Fish

SANTA FE – The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish is investigating a fish die off in the upper Pecos River from the village of Pecos to Cowles. The die off is affecting brown and rainbow trout and is being attributed to stress induced by low water conditions and poor water quality throughout late summer and early fall. Most of the fish observed were adult brown trout and a few rainbow trout. The department expects more fish to die through the fall as brown trout undergo spawning stress and flows continue to be very low.

Fish that are caught using legal fishing equipment are safe to consume; however, it is not recommended to collect and consume fish that are dead or dying.

If you see fish die offs, please contact the department immediately at (888) 248-6866.

The department will continue to evaluate waters statewide and will stock fish in waters that remain healthy for the fish. Waters that have been affected by die offs will be restocked when water conditions are suitable.

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Fly Fishing Rio Costilla New Mexico https://nmffg.com/rio-costilla-fly-fishing/fly-fishing-rio-costilla-new-mexico/ https://nmffg.com/rio-costilla-fly-fishing/fly-fishing-rio-costilla-new-mexico/#respond Sun, 17 Mar 2019 17:12:04 +0000 https://nmffg.com/?p=1351 A high meadow (9000′) tailwater, the Costilla provides anglers with dry fly action for Rio Grande Cutts from mid-June through mid-September. Costilla Cutts aren’t the smartest fish in the world, but they may be the fastest. We’ve seen many an experienced angler shake their heads and ask “Am I too late or too early?” Lots […]

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A high meadow (9000′) tailwater, the Costilla provides anglers with dry fly action for Rio Grande Cutts from mid-June through mid-September. Costilla Cutts aren’t the smartest fish in the world, but they may be the fastest. We’ve seen many an experienced angler shake their heads and ask “Am I too late or too early?” Lots of takes here. If you connect on 50% of them you’re doing well. A great place for anglers of all levels.

Rainbow Trout New Mexico Fly Fishing Guide

The Valle Vidal Section is a nine mile section below the Costilla reservoir damn. This area is catch and release flies only and opens July 1st. Flows are regulated so that Friday, Saturday and Sunday are low flow and Monday through Thursday flows are higher. Weekdays are always better here. This area is 1 hour north of Taos and easily accessible by car.

Visibility: 12 inches

Water temperature at mid-day: 60 Degrees F

Water condition: Clear

Best time of day to fish: Late morning through afternoon

Best stretch: Valle Vidal (opens July 1 each year). Rio Costilla Park and the lower private water fishes mid May through September.

Best access point: Rio Costilla Park

Fish species: Cutthroats and Cuttbows

Fishing season: Valle Vidal Section opens July 1 each year. RCCLA open all year but fishes mid May through Sept

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Saltwater Fly Fishing https://nmffg.com/fly-fishing-stories/saltwater-fly-fishing/ https://nmffg.com/fly-fishing-stories/saltwater-fly-fishing/#respond Fri, 15 Mar 2019 20:41:15 +0000 https://nmffg.com/?p=1348 There is an art to fly fishing, and when you mix it with saltwater prepare for fantastic strikes and unforgettable fights. Saltwater fishing is a varied experience, but you may be wondering why you would want to toss a line onto the top of the water while fishing out in the middle of the deep […]

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New Mexico Fly Fishing Guide

There is an art to fly fishing, and when you mix it with saltwater prepare for fantastic strikes and unforgettable fights.

Saltwater fishing is a varied experience, but you may be wondering why you would want to toss a line onto the top of the water while fishing out in the middle of the deep ocean. Let’s start with a quick overview of the top game fish you can land by saltwater fly fishing.

Top Saltwater Fly Fishing Game Species From Bonefish to Striper and other amazing saltwater game fish, there’s no shortage of fantastic species you can catch with a fly.

While you’re out in deeper waters, it may seem counter-intuitive to keep a line at or just below the surface, but when it comes to catching these species you’ll find it makes complete sense.

Barracuda love to feed in the flats and are hyper aware of their surroundings with a sight range of up to 20 feet. They’re also ambush predators, so use a clear line that won’t tip them off when you toss a fly about five to 15 feet in front of the fish. Artificial Needlefish tied flies will often do the trick with Barracuda.

Bonefish, like Barracuda, are a sight fishing game fish that love warm tropical waters. Choose a bonefish taper, as these are specifically designed to withstand hot weather conditions, combined with a fly designed to imitate the Bonefish’s natural prey (crustaceans like shrimp and crab) for the best results.

Dorado, as a general rule, are going to prefer dark patterns capable of producing silhouettes. When choosing a fly, it may help to experiment with colors depending on water quality, but it’s typically best to choose one that will disturb the waters to trick the Dorado onto your line.

Texas Saltwater Fishing Guide

Pacific Sailfish are some of the easiest billfish to catch, but that doesn’t mean just any tactics will get you the strike. You can find them in tropical waters herding bait near the surface, so start by using a teaser to lure them closer to your boat until you drop in the fly. Once they fall for the trick, prepare for a 30-minute fight with awesome photo opportunities as this powerful fish puts on their characteristic acrobatics show.

Permit are easily spooked, so when you’re fly fishing for these game fish you really need to know how to place your fly. You want to make sure it’s very close to the fish, which can also be difficult since Permit are typically bottom-feeders; but, if you choose a weighted, crab-like fly and bring some patience on your fishing trip, you’ll find success getting a strike.

Redfish like to cruise in murky waters, so your fly is going to need to be large enough for the fish to see. You’ll find the best results are when you focus on your casting and presentation, since this fish fights strong but doesn’t make long runs. Many different patterns will catch a Redfish as long as you choose a fly that’s about 3 inches long to toss into shallow waters. Looking to catch Redfish with live bait? Check out more tips on our blog, How-to Choose Saltwater Live Bait.

Roosterfish are known to pummel flies and pull hard when they’re on the hook. If you’re looking to challenge your casting skills and patience, head out to the beach and search for black and gray stripes that stand out against the surf; you can also find them in forage areas in deeper waters. Your fly line can float or sink, but your fly needs to change depending on conditions. Roosterfish fly fisherman have the best luck with Crease Flies, wide-bodied bucktails or ultra-hair baitfish in black, gray, tan, and white color variations.

Snook thrive in water temperatures 70 degrees and above, so they’ll be more easily spotted in the flats year-round or around coastal bays and beaches by late spring. Equip your fly line with cast foam poppers, deer-hair bugs or shrimp and baitfish patterns for the classic approach to Snook fly fishing. Most of your casting will be done in close quarters, so prepare for a quick strike and fight to get the fish landed.

Striped Bass (Striper) are a popular saltwater fly fishing species because they’re a large, strong fish that will put up a good fight after eagerly going for your fly. They’re natural predators for live bait such as threadfin and gizzard shad, so choose flies that imitate the bait, such as Deceivers and Whistlers, and toss your line into moving waters.

Tarpon are going to eat a variety of prey throughout their lifetime, from minnows as babies to crabs and bigger baitfish as adults, so you have a wide range of flies to choose from for this fish. In general, saltwater fly fishing anglers can get Tarpon to strike with well-place lines baited with a Toad, Tarpon Tapa, EP Tarpon Streamer, Cockroach or Tarpon Mouse (Slider).

Texas Saltwater Fishing Guide

We talked a lot about flies, one of the most critical components of your saltwater fly fishing gear, for each of these species, but flies aren’t the only thing to consider when you’re going for the strike. Choosing Saltwater Fly Fishing Gear There are few things more important to the art of fly fishing than your gear. Namely, you want to make sure you have the right rod, reel, fly line, and fly to get your fly fishing game off to the best start. When picking out your gear, to consider where you are going to be fishing, and what fish you are hoping to get on your line. By knowing these two pieces of information you can speak with local fly fishing anglers or someone at a local tackle shop to pick out what you’ll need, but there are some basic setups that work well for many saltwater fish species.

Start by selecting your rod, since your fly rod will determine the rest of your gear. There are plenty of rods to choose from, so try not to get too caught up in the details when you’re starting out. They’ll matter more when you’ve become a seasoned saltwater fly fishing angler going for a very specific fish. Instead, choose a versatile, multi-purpose, 9-feet long and 9 to 10-weight fly rod that you feel comfortable with. It doesn’t need to be the most expensive option, but try to steer away from the cheapest rods as well since a poor rod can ruin your experience.

Once you have your rod, you need to add a reel. Start by looking matching the weight of the reel to your rod, or it won’t work. Then look at the drag type, usually either center or offset. From there, choose the arbor size, which refers to the diameter of the spool. You’ll do well with a mid-arbor reel for general use while saltwater fly fishing. To save money, you can also look for a fly rod and reel combination, referred to as a “Fly Rod Outfit.”

Then, you are ready to add your fly line. Choosing a line is going to depend on where and how you will be fly fishing, so this is where you’ll benefit the most from talking to more experienced anglers. They can let you know if you need a floating or sinking, opaque or clear line to get the strike. To finish out your gear, add fly backing, a leader, and a tippet for your fly.

Final Tips for Saltwater Fly Fishing It can be helpful to bring back-up gear on your saltwater fly fishing adventure aren’t biting and you need to switch it up to get the strike. As long as you have a multi-purpose rod and reel, and a solid fly line that will do well for most fish, you can keep your pack a little lighter by bringing along little more than what is on your back and a tackle box filled with a wide variety of flies.

Just remember that as with all types of fishing, saltwater fly fishing is often going to require patience and commitment to figuring out what’s working based on the conditions that day. So don’t give up, and keep practicing your fly fishing cast until you land that trophy fish! You can also always try other types of Saltwater Fishing and come back to fly fishing!

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